Buzzr ‘Lost and Found’

(Pictured above: Gene Rayburn, photo by Les Luchter)

You can play along with rare classic game shows all this week from 8-10 pm ET/PT on over-the-air channel Buzzr.

Tonight’s first installment of Buzzr’s “Lost and Found” features shows hosted by Gene Rayburn: Make the Connection (1955), Choose Up Sides (1956), and the first episode of the original Match Game (1962). To fit in both original and new commercials, each episode runs 40 minutes.

Here, recorded off the air on December 5, 1962, is the premiere of The Match Game:

Another “Lost and Found” highlight is Nothing but the Truth (1956), the original pilot for To Tell the Truth, a series which has now run in some form or another over seven decades. Hosted by future news legend Mike Wallace, and with Dick Van Dyke as a panelist, you can catch this gem Friday at 9:20 pm on Buzzr — or stream it right here:

For baseball fans, New York Yankees rookie Mickey Mantle guests on the first episode of It’s News to Me from May 1951, airing on Buzzr Friday at 8 pm.

Other “Lost and Found” shows include:

  • Monday: Make the Connection (1955), Choose Up Sides (1956)
  • Tuesday: Wordplay (1986), Trivia Trap (1984)
  • Wednesday: Missing Links (1963), Winner Takes All (1952), Play for Keeps (1955)
  • Thursday: Richard Simmons’ Dream Maker (1999), Body Talk (1990), Star Words (1983)
  • Friday: Play Your Hunch (1960), with guest Jonathan Winters.

For the complete “Lost and Found” schedule, visit buzzrplay.com/schedule. To find where to watch Buzzr, go to buzzrplay.com, click on “Find Buzzr in Your Area,” and enter your zip code.

 

 

About Les Luchter

Les Luchter is a former managing editor of Multichannel News, editor-in-chief of Cable Marketing, and news editor of Broadcast Week.

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2 thoughts on “Buzzr ‘Lost and Found’”

  1. During one of my High School classes, one of my teachers once shared with our class that he and his wife were contestants on a game show called
    “For Love Or Money”.
    Ever heard of this show? It was probably make in the late 60’s … early seventy’s.

    Reply

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